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‘Changing Ireland’s first front-cover featured a real-life nun dressed as a beardy man. The artwork was part of a campaign by a community group to challenge stereotypes.

 

 

Contact Changing Ireland

To contact Changing Ireland click here



 
first cover
Our first edition

 

Who produces 'Changing Ireland'?

Articles are written by, among others, people working in community development workers and social inclusion work in Ireland, including volunteers. Production is overseen by an editor and a voluntary editorial board. We have provided work placement opportunities, including paid work, for a small number of excellent apprentice reporters over the years.

The magazine is produced in Moyross, Limerick, by Changing Ireland Community Media Ltd, the not-for-profit company responsible for the project. The all-volunteer board members come from around the country and have a wide variety of experience and a sound understanding of social inclusion issues.

The work is primarily funded by the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government.

Board members: Gearoid Fitzgibbon (chair), Ellen Duffy, Viv Sadd, Kay Flanagan, Claire Gallery, Seamus McGiff, George Clancy, Jude Meaney and Cathy Jones.


'Changing Ireland' Facts

In a Nutshell: 'Changing Ireland' magazine is editorially independent and gives people and communities on the margins a voice and in particular to highlight remarkable achievements at community level. We're focused on positives. Established in 2001 and based in a refurbished bungalow in Moyross, Limerick, the magazine is core-funded by Government. It earns additional income from social enterprise activities which is put back into the magazine.

The company's main work is its quarterly print magazine which is for sale in retail outlets including Easons and goes directly by post to close to 5,000 workers and volunteers on the ground across communities nationwide and in social inclusion posts in local and central Government.

The magazine is the most popular publication in the Community & Voluntary Sector.

It employs two staff members, with up to 15 people involved at different times with the project on a voluntary basis.

It employs a sense of humour; most of the work we focus on is deadly serious.

It's readable, to-the-point and of practical use to readers.

The magazine highlights proven solutions to supposedly impossible social problems. Our core funder is the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government.

It gives activists, workers and volunteers on the ground a chance to show what works, highlight the positives and raise thorny issues in the expectation of influencing policy. They provide the news and often write it themselves.

It focuses on 'participation', 'empowerment' and 'best practice' and is underpinned by Community Development principles. Community Development is a key tool in challenging the causes and reducing the effects of poverty and disadvantage.'Changing Ireland' magazine aims to be challenging and empowering.

The magazine is packed by participants involved in an award-winning social enterprise company Speedpak Ltd, based in Coolock, Dublin.

it is printed using vegetable inks and on mostly recycled paper (excepting the glossy cover).

The magazine welcomes advertising. For details including our ratecard click here.Advertise with Changing Ireland

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Our Moyross office is an example of local regeneration - a formerly roofless bungalow that was among six bungalows restored in 2000 and fitted out as business units in Sarsfield Gardens, Moyross. The office is located in the heart of the community.

 

Mission Statement:

‘Changing Ireland’ champions Community Development.

Our company's mission statement reads: "Changing Ireland Community Media Limited takes a positive, sustainable and inclusive approach and is uncompromising in its promotion of community development principles and practice, which is the bedrock on which its integrity is based."

It enables over 24,000 readers (via print and online) to network more effectively and learn from each other as it promotes Community Development in Ireland. It is intended to be readable and interesting and is written by community workers in various parts of the country - so that it reflects the experience of tackling poverty and exclusion at community level.

 

OUR READERS


The printed edition of ‘Changing Ireland’ goes out to 15,000 people, mostly by post while over 1,500 people receive the magazine electronically and a couple of hundred purchase the magazine through Eason outlets.

Our readers include:– Members of the public (via EM News Distribution & hundreds of community centres), all political representatives in the ROI (all councillors, TDs, Senators, MEPs), senior management and on-the-ground staff in (a) local authorities (b) Local Development Companies (aka Partnership or LEADER companies) (c) Community Development Projects (d) Family Resource Centres, (e) community policing units (f) students of community development and related courses (eg youthwork, drugs work). Subscribers also include all university libraries, city and local enterprise offices, disability organisations, NGOs, UN agencies, trade unions, national umbrella bodies, state agencies including Pobal, employees working in various social inclusion programmes and members of the media.
The magazine is also directly distributed to key civil servants and agency staff and to hundreds of Community Development workers and volunteers who have subscribed independently over the years.

Editorial Team Members

Members:

  • Allen Meagher, 'Changing Ireland' editor.
  • Viv Sadd, Co-ordinator, Mahon CDP, Cork.
  • Joe Saunders, independent communications consultant.
  • Juan Carlos Azzopardi, Manager, Limerick City CDP, Limerick
  • Gearoid Fitzgibbon, Development Worker, North Tipperary Leader Partnership
  • One representative, Department of Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs.

 

The EDITOR

Allen Meagher is a member of the NUJ. He also lectures in journalism.
From 1989-1995, he worked as a provincial journalist in Cork, Tyrone, Wexford, Mayo and the Midlands.
In 1995, he moved to the The Gambia, West Africa, to volunteer as Publications Officer with the National Council for Arts and Culture and as a trainer with the Gambia Press Union.
In 1999 he graduated with a Masters in International Studies and began to lecture in journalism and media for City & Guilds at H.S.I. College in Limerick.
In 2001, he was hired as founding editor of ‘Changing Ireland’.
Internationally, Allen has reported on development issues from Albania, Brazil, The Philippines and elsewhere.
He has produced work for the BBC, RTE and most Irish newspapers. He was part of an award-winning BBC 'Spotlight' investigation and more recently (2011) his investigative work led to a landmark court case about online hate crime.

 

'Changing Ireland' in the media

RTE's 'Winning Streak' mini-documentary about us.

RTE Radio One's 'THE BUSINESS' (April 12th, '09)
(Skip to just shy of half-way through the PODCAST if you want to get straight to our 7 mins)

'THE SUNDAY BUSINESS POST' was charmed by our going green and also by “the magazine’s quality, optimism and can do mentality” ? Stephen Price, SBP

 

Who produces 'Changing Ireland'?

Articles are written by, among others, people working in community development workers and social inclusion work in Ireland, including volunteers. Production is overseen by an editor and a voluntary editorial board. We have provided work placement opportunities, including paid work, for a small number of excellent apprentice reporters over the years.

The magazine is produced in Moyross, Limerick, by Changing Ireland Community Media Ltd, the not-for-profit company responsible for the project. The all-volunteer board members come from around the country and have a wide variety of experience and a sound understanding of social inclusion issues.

The work is primarily funded by the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government.

Board members: Gearoid Fitzgibbon (chair), Ellen Duffy, Viv Sadd, Kay Flanagan, Claire Gallery, Seamus McGiff, George Clancy, Jude Meaney and Cathy Jones.


'Changing Ireland' BACKGROUND:
- produced in Moyross, Limerick

In 1999, the then-Department of Social, Family and Community Affairs and community workers on an advisory board decided to set up a national magazine to promote the work of the Community Development Programme.
The Department thought it best to place the project in one of the communities where community development work was making a real difference.
The Community Development Network (CDN) in Moyross, Limerick won the contract. Doors opened in 2001.

One of the founder members of the project, Juan Carlos Azzopardi, said Moyross won the project because they knew what the magazine should do: “We didn’t want it to be all jargon. We wanted it to be about the people in the projects. It had to grab the interest of those working on the ground and we'd experience producing our own local magazine."

In 2001, Allen Meagher was appointed and became the founding editor of ‘Changing Ireland’.

“‘Changing Ireland’ would be just another magazine and would not have the same ethos if based outside the community,” said former voluntary management member and Moyross worker, Tracey McElligott. “The magazine gives communities around the country a voice.”

Gearoid Fitzgibbon
Gearoid Fitzgibbon
Chairperson

In early 2011, the CDN's work was absorbed by Limerick City CDP and 'Changing Ireland' set up as an independent not-for-profit company with its own voluntary board of directors.

 

 

Changing Ireland's early years in Moyross

‘Changing Ireland’ is part of Moyross.

The project's host community was at the centre of media storms in the past and, in 2007, Moyross was included as part of a major regeneration scheme for the city’s disadvantaged areas.
Media producers have sometimes reported sensationally about Moyross - and indeed Limerick - without visiting and meeting residents or people from the community.
‘Changing Ireland’ plays its part in countering the stereotyped view of the area, challenging the portrayals by media producers and inviting them to visit and meet people in the community.

Horse School

‘Changing Ireland’ has worked with pupils from Corpus Christi Primary School in Moyross who produced their own media. They reported:

The most educated young people in Ireland about horses are the pupils of Corpus Christi Primary School in Moyross.
“There are more horses in Moyross than anywhere else,” said Jeffrey Payne. “We had a farrier and specialists about horses here from the Curragh in Kildare to teach us how to care better for our horses, how to tie good knots, how to clean a saddle and soften it up,” explained Jeffrey, ably assisted by his class-mates, Tony Stanners, Conor and Colm Cantillon, Christopher Higgins, Eric Ryan, Martin Payne, Lee Quinn, John Stanners, Evan O’Keefe and Paddy Llewellyn.

 
Horse Students Photo
Their first certificates: Students of Corpus Christi Primary School, Moyross, with Ms. O'Sullivan, Lesley Jones of the Irish Horse Welfare Trust and Ms. Browne.
“You stay on the horse easier with a saddle,” added Jeffrey.

There is some debate among the pupils over whether saddles are really useful. The Irish Horse Welfare Trust ran the course after home-school liason officer, Tiernan O’Neill, set it all up.
“I was so happy when I got my certificate,” said Martin Payne.
Twelve pupils completed the course, including Ger and Christopher Walsh and Danielle Tuite. It took place in February and March over six weeks and the pupils range in age from 8 to 12.
“We’ve even taught our teachers about horses. They were clueless before they met us,” said the class. “For example, they now know that horses like to eat oats, grass, nuts, potato skins and apples. We knew this even before the experts from the Curragh came down.”

• This report was written by the boys named above as part of a ‘Changing Ireland’ local media project.